Headline data

inequalityHealthy life expectancy is 59.6 for men [Chart - Male healthy life expectancy] and 59.1 for women [Chart - Female healthy life expectancy].[1] This is the first time in recent years that male healthy life expectancy has been greater than that for females (although confidence intervals mean no significant conclusions can be drawn at this point). Healthy life expectancy for men in Gateshead is about 4 years less than across England as a whole and for women it is about 4 1/2 years less. Compared to the North East, healthy life expectancy for men in Gateshead is about the same, but for women it is over 1 year less than the North East average.

Healthy life expectancy for men living in Felling is 14.9 years less than for men living in Whickham South and Sunniside. Similarly, healthy life expectancy for women living in Felling is 14.2 years less than for women living in Whickham South and Sunniside.[2]

Life expectancy in Gateshead is currently 77.5 years for men [Chart - Male life expectancy] and 81.4 years for women [Chart - Female life expectancy].[3] This is an increase since the previous year of 0.1 years for women, whilst the rate for men has remained exactly the same. It follows a decrease for both men and women in the previous year. Both rates continue to be below the England average. The gap to England currently stands at 2.1 years lower for men and 1.7 years lower for women.

Life Expectancy Male and Female

The Life Expectancy Gap Segment Tool shows that the biggest cause of deaths that helps to explains why Gateshead has a higher mortality rate than England is circulatory diseases (25%) for men and cancer (26%) for women.[4]

Life Expectancy Gap Causes of Deaths - Gateshead to England

In Gateshead, life expectancy for men is 10.3 years less in the most deprived compared to the least deprived areas (deciles); for women, the difference is 9.0 years [Chart - Slope index of inequality in male life expectancy Chart - Slope index of inequality in female life expectancy].[5] For both men and women the gap in life expectancy between people living in the most deprived and the least deprived areas has overall been increasing over time.

Life expectancy for men living in Dunston & Teams is 9.1 years less than for men living in Low Fell [Map - Ward male life expectancy]. Women living in Felling will live on average 9.1 fewer years than women living in Whickham South and Sunniside [Map - Ward female life expectancy].[6]

The change in the most common causes of death for men and women over the last 100 years are shown in the chart below. An interactive version of the chart and further information is available on the ONS website [Chart - Changes in the most common causes of death].[7]

Most Common Causes of Death 1915 to 2015

babyBetween 2015 and 2017 there were 25 infant deaths (aged under 1) or 3.8 per 1,000 live births compared with the England average of 3.9 [Chart - Infant mortality rates].[8]

Between 2015 and 2017 there were 13 child deaths (aged 1 - 17) or 11.5 per 100,000 population (DSR or Directly Standardised Rate - this removes any difference due to age so that Gateshead is comparable with other areas) compared with the England average of 11.2 (this is not significantly different) [Chart - Child mortality rates].[9]


[1] Mortality, MYE data and Annual Population Survey, ONS 2015-17 (PHOF website)

[2] Health State Life Expectancy at Birth, ONS 2009-13 (ONS website)

[3] Mortality and MYE data, ONS 2015-17 (PHOF website)

[4] Life Expectancy Gap Segment Tool, PHE 2015-17 [updated July 2019] (PHE Segment Tool website)

[5] Slope Index of Inequality Mortality and MYE data, DCLG IMD 2015, ONS 2015-17 (PHOF website)

[6] Mortality and MYE data, ONS 2013-17 (Local Health website)

[7] ONS 20th and 21st century mortality files, 2015 (ONS website)

[8] Infant Mortality, ONS, 2015-17 (Public Health Outcomes Framework website)

[9] Child Mortality, ONS, 2015-17 (Child and Maternal Health website)

Last modified on 19th July 2019

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